The Centre contributes chapters to books published by other organisations, on subjects related to urban liveability and sustainability. Interested readers may find these publications from major bookstores and libraries. 

The Future of Asian and Pacific Cities 2019: Transformative Pathways Towards Sustainable Urban Development

Article Title
The Future of Smart & Inclusive Cities

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities (Yuting Xu, Elyssa Ludher, Kankang Zhu and Yimin Zhou)

Synopsis

The cities of 2030, 2050 and 2100 will be very different from today. They will be cities transformed: in their demographic composition, in their implementation of technology and in their wider ecological contexts. The challenges of building cities sustainable enough to meet the changing needs of the future will require new ways of thinking and working, as well as new kinds of multi-stakeholder initiatives and partnerships. The Future of Asian and Pacific Cities report 2019 makes the case for four priorities and four approaches to realize a sustainable urban future in Asia and the Pacific. A sustainable future occurs when urban and territorial planning lays a foundation; resilience guards against future risk; smart cities deploy the best technology for the job; and financing tools help pay for it all. Getting these essentials right in Asian and Pacific cities today is vital in order to adapt to the demands of tomorrow and to deliver on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the New Urban Agenda.

The Future of Asian and Pacific Cities report 2019 was jointly developed by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme in partnership with the Asian Development Bank, Centre for Livable Cities Singapore, the European Union, The Rockefeller Foundation and the United Nations Development Programme.


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Cultural Connections Vol. 4

Article Title
Place-making and Identity in Singapore: Te Role of Integrated Planning and Our Built Heritage

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities (Elaine Tan and Tan Xin Wei Andy)

Synopsis

From the early days of identifying national monuments to the conservation of districts and historic sites, the emphasis on identity and conservation of our built heritage has been an integral part of urban planning. In the journey of conservation and the search for identity, there are key decision points, tradeoffs, players and enabling factors that pave the way for systemic innovation to make conservation an integral part of planning and a significant part of the Singaporean consciousness. A unique built environment and the community’s attachment and memories of places are reflective of the history of the nation and the love it engenders in its people, which in turn are distinguishing contributors to identity. Today, the public’s dialogue and active involvement in conservation and identity issues reflects a shift in how the public can be engaged, the rising importance of public knowledge about the buildings and sites that are close to their hearts, and reveals how site history and social memory—beyond architectural significance—is a key element of redevelopment plans.


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A Better World: Sustainable Cities and Communities

Article Title
Making Cities and Human Settlements Inclusive, Safe, Resilient and Sustainable

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities

Synopsis

Singapore is a city-state with limited land and a high urban density. These unique circumstances demand the prudent and strategic use of space to ensure sustainable development, given an increasing population and the necessity of economic growth. This requires sound and dynamic urban governance combined with integrated long-term planning to ensure sufficient land for sustainable growth as well as a convenient and high-quality living environment for Singaporeans. Singapore therefore works with various stakeholders on policies such as those geared towards public housing and an integrated transport network, while ensuring the incorporation of green spaces throughout the urban landscape. Ultimately, the goal is to create a pleasant environment in which all Singaporeans can work, live, and play.


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Connected Cities: Citizen insights across Asia Pacific

Chapter Title
Embracing technology to enable more liveable and sustainable cities

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities (Limin Hee)

Chapter Synopsis

The Connected Cities: Citizen insights across Asia Pacific report published by KPMG, in association with CLP, JOS, Smart City Consortium, Siemens and Wilson Group, looks at how five Asia Pacific cities—Hong Kong, Melbourne, Seoul, Shanghai and Singapore—are implementing smart city development initiatives. The report features a survey of over 4,000 citizens in the five cities, tracking residents’ expectations and priorities for development in six focus areas: transportation and mobility, building a future focused workforce, living environment, healthcare, energy and resources and the impact of technology.

Across all five cities, creating a better living environment with thoughtful urban planning and design emerged as the overall top priority. A close second was improving healthcare delivery and access for residents. It takes good planning and governance to make smart cities work, says CLC’s Director Dr Limin Hee. Read more about Dr Hee's commentary and CLC’s case study on Singapore’s OneService initiative in the report. 


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200 Years of Singapore and the United Kingdom

Chapter Title
Contributions of the British to Public Housing and Town Planning in Singapore

Authors
Khoo Teng Chye, Stewart Tan and Melissa Chan

Chapter Synopsis

The Singapore Bicentennial, which marks the 200th anniversary of the arrival of Stamford Raffles and William Farquhar in Singapore, is an opportunity to tell afresh the story of the relationship between Singapore and the United Kingdom. 200 Years of Singapore and The United Kingdom captures major historical developments before the arrival of the British, as well as during the last 200 years.

CLC contributed an essay on the foundation of Singapore’s Public Housing and Town Planning left by the British, which led to ethnic clusters and housing towns that continue to permeate the present day.

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Experience Singapore (Jul-Sep 2018 issue)


Chapter Title
The ASEAN Way: Addressing the challenges and opportunities that urbanisation and digitalisation present in the region

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities

Chapter Synopsis
“Experience Singapore” is a quarterly magazine published by Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) and it is distributed to all the foreign participants of the Singapore Cooperation Programme’s training courses. CLC contributed an article that focuses on the opportunities, challenges and necessity of becoming a Smart Nation. The article also highlights Singapore’s efforts in achieving digitalisation in various sectors and how Singapore helped other countries to do the same through the establishment of the ASEAN Smart Cities Network (ASCN).

Vietnam at 4.0 Doorstep Smart Cities


Chapter Title
Innovative and people-centric urban development for ASEAN cities

Authors
Lim Teng Leng and Xu Yuting

Chapter Synopsis
CLC’s opinion piece on Singapore’s Smart Nation Development and the ASEAN Smart Cities Network (ASCN) was published on Vietnam Investment Review’s Bilingual Special Publication “Vietnam at 4.0 Doorstep Smart Cities”. This op-ed outlines the need to have innovative and people-centric solutions in smart cities development and illustrates the significance of ASCN in strengthening regional cooperation to catalyse smart cities across ASEAN countries.

Cultural Connections Vol. 2

Article Title
A Historic Heart: How Heritage Districts Can Make Cities More Liveable

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities (Michael Koh and Katyana Melic)

Synopsis

A liveable city is one where a high quality of life, sustainable environment and competitive economy are made accessible to all its residents. Historic districts contribute towards the liveability, accessibility and attractiveness of a city. Conserved historic buildings and their related urban spaces help anchor a city’s distinctive identity, providing residents with a sense of rootedness and civic pride, while also attracting visitors from afar. Providing shared public spaces in these districts encourages interactions that nurture a thriving communal life and social integration. But all these outcomes call for the active and thoughtful participation of local planners and programmers, and effective partnerships between the public and private sectors, to ensure that the built environment can contribute to Singapore’s liveability as a city, with authentic, thriving neighbourhoods and inclusive communities.


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The Population and Social Development Report 2016 - Ageing population and related policies (2016年人口和社会发展研究报告 – 老龄化及其对策)


Chapter Title
The Population and Social Development Report 2016 - Ageing population and related policies (2016年人口和社会发展研究报告 – 老龄化及其对策)

Authors
Centre for Liveable Cities (Tan Guan Hong)

Chapter Synopsis
As part of CLC’s MOU with National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), CLC contributed a case study of Singapore’s urban governance and planning approach for an ageing population over the past 50 years as NDRC was analysing the urban challenge of a rapidly ageing population in China. CLC’s case study documents Singapore’s approaches, policies and programmes, particularly in areas such as senior-friendly housing and building an age-friendly city.

 

Livable Cities From A Global Perspective


Chapter Title
A Global Perspective on Building a Livable City: Singapore’s Framework

Authors
Khoo Teng Chye and Chong Hwee Jane

Chapter Synopsis
With a population density of over five million residents living on 719 square kilometres of land, Singapore is one of only a few highly dense cities in the world to consistently rank high in various global surveys of liveability of cities. How did Singapore achieve this balance of density and liveability in a short span of five decades, and what did Singapore learn in the process of achieving this balance? Through studying Singapore’s urban development experience, this chapter distils the broad principles that have guided the city-state’s transformation over the years, and examines how these same principles also underlie the development of other successful cities around the world. This suggests that there may be broad universal principles useful for the development of liveable and sustainable cities.

50 Years of Urban Planning in Singapore

50 Years of Urban Planning in Singapore is an accessible and comprehensive volume on Singapore's planning approach to urbanization. The volume brings together the diverse perspectives of practitioners and academics in the professional and research fields of planning, architecture, urbanism, and city-making.

Chapter Title
Making Singapore a Liveable and Sustainable City: Our Urban Systems Approach

Authors
Khoo Teng Chye and Remy Guo

Chapter Synopsis
Singapore’s urban development not only saw the transformation of urban slums into a thriving global city within four decades; it also achieved high liveability standards despite the high density urban environment. What are the lessons learnt in the process? This chapter illustrates the key principles of Singapore’s approach to integrated master planning and development, using examples from Singapore’s urban development process. Key urban development policies and plans are discussed to provide a practitioner-oriented insight into Singapore’s unique system of urban planning and development.

Shin Toshi

The article was published in July of 2015 in SHIN TOSHI, a Japanese monthly magazine on urban development issues.

Chapter Title
Building Global Competitiveness the Singaporean Way

Authors
Alisha Gill, Jean Chia

Chapter Synopsis
Singapore – then a 587 square kilometres island, lacking in natural resources, an industrial capital class and industrial skills - became an independent state on 9 August 1965. In 2012, Singapore’s GDP per capita (adjusted for purchasing power parity) was the sixth highest in the world at US$60,500, putting it ahead of all G7 countries. How did Singapore do it? In this article, we explain the government’s role in building Singapore’s global competitiveness. 

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ISOCARP Review 10: Water and Cities – Managing a vital relationship

The International Society of City and Regional Planners (ISOCARP) is a global association of experienced professional planners. This article was published in 2014 in ISOCARP Review issue 10 on the occasion of the 50th ISOCARP congress in Gdynia, Poland.
 
Chapter Title
Water and Cities: The Singapore Story

Authors
Lau Ying Shan, Mercy Wong

Chapter Synopsis
Singapore is one example of a city that has been successful in managing its water resource through careful planning and meticulous execution. While the monsoons bring intense, heavy rains, its small land area means it has a limited water catchment area. Despite these challenges, Singapore has evolved from being a ‘basket case of urbanisation’ in the 1950s and 60s, to a first-world city in about half a century. Its success would not have been possible without good governance and management of water, an essential foundation for human development.

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Public Sector Digest

Public Sector Digest is a Canada-based monthly periodical aimed at senior government officials and written to advance the managerial capacity of the public sector. This article was was published in the Dec 2014 issue of Public Sector Digest.

Chapter Title
Singapore: How To Build a Liveable City

Authors
Khoo Teng Chye

Chapter Synopsis
Singapore today is one of only a few cities in the world recognised for achieving high standards of liveability and sustainable development, despite a high population density. This would have been difficult to imagine in the 1960s, when Singapore was plagued by economic woes, poor infrastructure and squalid conditions. This leap was the result of decades of deliberate planning and implementation to strike a balance between density, development, and liveability. The CLC Liveability Framework, distilled from a study of Singapore’s urban development experience, outlines principles that underpin effective urban planning and governance.

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